Don't Forget These!

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Don't Forget These!

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***ATTENTION*** We are no longer accepting new orders as of June 23, 2020. We will reopen in a few months. Covid-19 has been extremely hard on us this season and we need some time to build up our inventory as well as take a breather. We appreciate your continued interest in our products and hope to see you all again in a few months!! Sign up for our newsletter to be the first to know when we are accepting new orders. A LOT of changes are coming including all new packaging, new items and more giving! Stay tuned! We are still selling a handful of "twin packs" and collections on Amazon.com!

ASPCA DONATIONS

In addition to sponsoring children monthly through programs such as Childfund.org and Compassion International, Seed Needs LLC also donates to ASPCA to help with any number of key issues listed below. We currently donate $100 per month and hope to continue with heavier donations as the years go by.

Cruelty Issues

As you read this, another innocent animal is being abused, neglected or forced to fight. The first step to creating positive change for these animals is recognizing the cruelty that threatens them. See the information below to better understand what ASPCA is fighting for and fighting against. 

DogFighting

Dogfighting is a type of blood sport in which dogs are forced to fight one another for the entertainment and/or profit of spectators.


Dogfighting is one of the most heinous forms of animal cruelty. Dogs used for fighting are typically raised in isolation, so they spend most of their lives on short, heavy chains. They are regularly conditioned for fighting through the use of drugs, including anabolic steroids to enhance muscle mass and encourage aggressiveness. Dogfighting victims may have their ears cropped and tails docked close to their bodies to minimize the animal’s normal body language cues and to limit areas that another dog can grab during a fight. Fighters usually perform this cropping/docking themselves using crude and inhumane techniques.


Although dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states, it continues to occur in every part of the country and in every type of community. Fights can happen in a variety of locations ranging from back alleys to carefully-staged enterprises. Fights typically take place in a 14-20 square-foot pit designed to contain the animals. Fights can last just a few minutes or several hours, and both animals may suffer injuries including puncture wounds, lacerations, blood loss, crushing injuries and broken bones. Although fights are not usually to the death, many dogs succumb to their injuries later, and losing dogs are often discarded, killed or brutally executed as part of the “sport.”


Learn More >

The Puppy Industry

Commercial breeders keep dogs barred from love, but dog lovers are fighting back!


Calling all dog lovers: Even if you’re not actively in the market for a new canine companion, you can take a stand and make a real difference for those who are suffering. From pushing back on government misdeeds to being a voice for the voiceless, we all have a part to play. 


There’s a reason the puppy mill industry doesn’t show you where their puppies come from. To turn a profit, corners need to be cut, and it’s the dogs imprisoned in puppy mills who pay the price both physically and emotionally.


Puppies born into this sad world are comparatively lucky in one way: because they need to be sold while they’re small and young, the time they spend in these facilities is brief. Unfortunately, the effects of where and how they were bred last a lifetime. Poor genetics, early weaning, unsanitary environments and significant stress can contribute to the development of serious health and behavioral problems that are expensive, difficult or impossible to treat.


Learn More >

Animal Hoarding

Animal hoarding occurs when an individual is housing more animals than he or she can adequately care for. It is a complex issue that encompasses mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns. Animal hoarding is defined by an inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care—often resulting in animal starvation, illness and death. In the majority of cases, animal hoarders believe they are helping their animals and deny this inability to provide minimum care.


Every year in the United States, a quarter of a million animals fall victim to hoarding. Animals collected range from cats and dogs to reptiles, rodents, birds, exotics and even farm animals. Animal hoarding is covered implicitly under every state’s animal cruelty statute, which typically requires caretakers to provide sufficient food, water and veterinary care. However, only two states, Illinois and Hawaii, currently have statutory language specifically addressing animal hoarding. In most cases, criminal prosecution of animal hoarding can be a difficult process and may not be the most effective route, since hoarders are often emotionally troubled rather than criminally inclined.


Learn More >

Farm Animal Welfare

In polling, 94% of Americans agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion land-based animals, plus countless more aquatic animals, farmed for food each year in the U.S. live in unacceptable conditions that do not align with consumers’ stated values.


Learn More >

Horse Slaughter

Last year, approximately 80,000 American horses were trucked over our borders to be slaughtered for human consumption. Until this practice is banned and Congress passes a law against slaughter here in the U.S., no horse is safe.  


Learn More > 

ASPCA DONATIONS

In addition to sponsoring children monthly through programs such as Childfund.org and Compassion International, Seed Needs LLC also donates to ASPCA to help with any number of key issues listed below. We currently donate $100 per month and hope to continue with heavier donations as the years go by.

Cruelty Issues

As you read this, another innocent animal is being abused, neglected or forced to fight. The first step to creating positive change for these animals is recognizing the cruelty that threatens them. See the information below to better understand what ASPCA is fighting for and fighting against. 

DogFighting

Dogfighting is a type of blood sport in which dogs are forced to fight one another for the entertainment and/or profit of spectators.


Dogfighting is one of the most heinous forms of animal cruelty. Dogs used for fighting are typically raised in isolation, so they spend most of their lives on short, heavy chains. They are regularly conditioned for fighting through the use of drugs, including anabolic steroids to enhance muscle mass and encourage aggressiveness. Dogfighting victims may have their ears cropped and tails docked close to their bodies to minimize the animal’s normal body language cues and to limit areas that another dog can grab during a fight. Fighters usually perform this cropping/docking themselves using crude and inhumane techniques.


Although dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states, it continues to occur in every part of the country and in every type of community. Fights can happen in a variety of locations ranging from back alleys to carefully-

staged enterprises. Fights typically take place in a 14-20 square-foot pit designed to contain the animals. Fights can last just a few minutes or several hours, and both animals may suffer injuries including puncture wounds, lacerations, blood loss, crushing injuries and broken bones. Although fights are not usually to the death, many dogs succumb to their injuries later, and losing dogs are often discarded, killed or brutally executed as part of the “sport.”


Learn More >

The Puppy Industry

Commercial breeders keep dogs barred from love, but dog lovers are fighting back!


Calling all dog lovers: Even if you’re not actively in the market for a new canine companion, you can take a stand and make a real difference for those who are suffering. From pushing back on government misdeeds to being a voice for the voiceless, we all have a part to play. 


There’s a reason the puppy mill industry doesn’t show you where their puppies come from. To turn a profit, corners need to be cut, and it’s the dogs imprisoned in puppy mills who pay the price both physically and emotionally.


Puppies born into this sad world are comparatively lucky in one way: because

they need to be sold while they’re small and young, the time they spend in thesefacilities is brief.

Unfortunately, the effects of where and how they were bred last a lifetime. Poor genetics, early weaning, unsanitary environments and significant stress can contribute to the development of serious health and behavioral problems that are expensive, difficult or impossible to treat.


Learn More >

Animal Hoarding

Animal hoarding occurs when an individual is housing more animals than he or she can adequately care for. It is a complex issue that encompasses mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns. Animal hoarding is defined by an inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care—often resulting in animal starvation, illness and death. In the majority of cases, animal hoarders believe they are helping their animals and deny this inability to provide minimum care.


Every year in the United States, a quarter of a million animals fall victim to hoarding. Animals collected range from cats and dogs to reptiles, rodents, birds, exotics and even farm animals. Animal hoarding is covered implicitly under every state’s animal cruelty statute, which typically requires caretakers to provide sufficient food, water and veterinary care. 

However, only two states, Illinois and Hawaii, currently have statutory language specifically addressing animal hoarding. In most cases, criminal prosecution of animal hoarding can be a difficult process and may not be the most effective route, since hoarders are often emotionally troubled rather than criminally inclined.


Learn More >

Farm Animal Welfare

In polling, 94% of Americans agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion land-based animals, plus countless more aquatic animals, farmed for food each year in the U.S. live in unacceptable conditions that do not align with consumers’ stated values.


Learn More >

Horse Slaughter

Last year, approximately 80,000 American horses were trucked over our borders to be slaughtered for human consumption. Until this practice is banned and Congress passes a law against slaughter here in the U.S., no horse is safe.  


Learn More > 

ASPCA DONATIONS

In addition to sponsoring children monthly through programs such as Childfund.org and Compassion International, Seed Needs LLC also donates to ASPCA to help with any number of key issues listed below. We currently donate $100 per month and hope to continue with heavier donations as the years go by.

Cruelty Issues

As you read this, another innocent animal is being abused, neglected or forced to fight. The first step to creating positive change for these animals is recognizing the cruelty that threatens them. See the information below to better understand what ASPCA is fighting for and fighting against. 

DogFighting

Dogfighting is a type of blood sport in which dogs are forced to fight one another for the entertainment and/or profit of spectators.


Dogfighting is one of the most heinous forms of animal cruelty. Dogs used for fighting are typically raised in isolation, so they spend most of their lives on short, heavy chains. They are regularly conditioned for fighting through the use of drugs, including anabolic steroids to enhance muscle mass and encourage aggressiveness. 

Dogfighting victims may have their ears cropped and tails docked close to their bodies to minimize the animal’s normal body language cues and to limit areas that another dog can grab during a fight. Fighters usually perform this cropping/docking themselves using crude and inhumane techniques.


Although dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states, it continues to occur in every part of the country and in every type of community. Fights can happen in a variety of locations ranging from back alleys to carefully-staged enterprises. Fights typically take place in a 14-20 square-foot pit designed to contain the animals.


Fights can last just a few minutes or several hours, and both animals may suffer injuries including puncture wounds, lacerations, blood loss, crushing injuries and broken bones. Although fights are not usually to the death, many dogs succumb to their injuries later, and losing dogs are often discarded, killed or brutally executed as part of the “sport.”


Learn More >


The Puppy Industry

Commercial breeders keep dogs barred from love, but dog lovers are fighting back!


Calling all dog lovers: Even if you’re not actively in the market for a new canine companion, you can take a stand and make a real difference for those who are suffering. From pushing back on government misdeeds to being a voice for the voiceless, we all have a part to play. 

There’s a reason the puppy mill industry doesn’t show you where their puppies come from. To turn a profit, corners need to be cut, and it’s the dogs imprisoned in puppy mills who pay the price both physically and emotionally.Puppies born into this sad world are comparatively lucky in one way: becausethey need to be sold while they’re small and young, the time they spend in these facilities is brief.


Unfortunately, the effects of where and how they were bred last a lifetime. Poor genetics, early weaning, unsanitary environments and significant stress can contribute to the development of serious health and behavioral problems that are expensive, difficult or impossible to treat.


Learn More >

Animal Hoarding

Animal hoarding occurs when an individual is housing more animals than he or she can adequately care for. It is a complex issue that encompasses mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns. Animal hoarding is defined by an inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care—often resulting in animal starvation, illness and death. In the majority of cases, animal hoarders believe they are helping their animals and deny this inability to provide minimum care.

Every year in the United States, a quarter of a million animals fall victim to hoarding. Animals collected range from cats and dogs to reptiles, rodents, birds, exotics and even farm animals. Animal hoarding is covered implicitly under every state’s animal cruelty statute, which typically requires caretakers to provide sufficient food, water and veterinary care. 


However, only two states, Illinois and Hawaii, currently have statutory language specifically addressing animal hoarding. In most cases, criminal prosecution of animal hoarding can be a difficult process and may not be the most effective route, since hoarders are often emotionally troubled rather than criminally inclined.


Learn More >

Farm Animal Welfare

In polling, 94% of Americans agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion land-based animals, plus countless more aquatic animals, farmed for food each year in the U.S. live in unacceptable conditions that do not align with consumers’ stated values.


Learn More >

Horse Slaughter

Last year, approximately 80,000 American horses were trucked over our borders to be slaughtered for human consumption. Until this practice is banned and Congress passes a law against slaughter here in the U.S., no horse is safe.  


Learn More > 

ASPCA DONATIONS

In addition to sponsoring children monthly through programs such as Childfund.org and Compassion International, Seed Needs LLC also donates to ASPCA to help with any number of key issues listed below. We currently donate $100 per month and hope to continue with heavier donations as the years go by.

Cruelty Issues

As you read this, another innocent animal is being abused, neglected or forced to fight. The first step to creating positive change for these animals is recognizing the cruelty that threatens them. See the information below to better understand what ASPCA is fighting for and fighting against. 

DogFighting


Dogfighting is a type of blood sport in which dogs are forced to fight one another for the entertainment and/or profit of spectators.


Dogfighting is one of the most heinous forms of animal cruelty. Dogs used for fighting are typically raised in isolation, so they spend most of their lives on short, heavy chains. They are regularly conditioned for fighting through the use of drugs, including anabolic steroids to enhance muscle mass and encourage aggressiveness. 


Dogfighting victims may have their ears cropped and tails docked close to their bodies to minimize the animal’s normal body language cues and to limit areas that another dog can grab during a fight. Fighters usually perform this cropping/docking themselves using crude and inhumane techniques.Although dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states, it continues to occur in every part of the country and in every type of community.


Fights can happen in a variety of locations ranging from back alleys to carefully-staged enterprises. Fights typically take place in a 14-20 square-foot pit designed to contain the animals.Fights can last just a few minutes or several hours, and both animals may suffer injuries including puncture wounds, lacerations, blood loss, crushing injuries and broken bones. Although fights are not usually to the death, many dogs succumb to their injuries later, and losing dogs are often discarded, killed or brutally executed as part of the “sport.”


Learn More >  

The Puppy Industry


Commercial breeders keep dogs barred from love, but dog lovers are fighting back!Calling all dog lovers: Even if you’re not actively in the market for a new canine companion, you can take a stand and make a real difference for those who are suffering. From pushing back on government misdeeds to being a voice for the voiceless, we all have a part to play.


There’s a reason the puppy mill industry doesn’t show you where their puppies come from. To turn a profit, corners need to be cut, and it’s the dogs imprisoned in puppy mills who pay the price both physically and emotionally.Puppies born into this sad world are comparatively lucky in one way: because they need to be sold while they’re small and young, the time they spend in these facilities is brief.


Unfortunately, the effects of where and how they were bred last a lifetime. Poor genetics, early weaning, unsanitary environments and significant stress can contribute to the development of serious health and behavioral problems that are expensive, difficult or impossible to treat.


Learn More >

Animal Hoarding


Animal hoarding occurs when an individual is housing more animals than he or she can adequately care for. It is a complex issue that encompasses mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns. Animal hoarding is defined by an inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care—often resulting in animal starvation, illness and death. In the majority of cases, animal hoarders believe they are helping their animals and deny this inability to provide minimum care.


Every year in the United States, a quarter of a million animals fall victim to hoarding. Animals collected range from cats and dogs to reptiles, rodents, birds, exotics and even farm animals. Animal hoarding is covered implicitly under every state’s animal cruelty statute, which typically requires caretakers to provide sufficient food, water and veterinary care. 


However, only two states, Illinois and Hawaii, currently have statutory language specifically addressing animal hoarding. In most cases, criminal prosecution of animal hoarding can be a difficult process and may not be the most effective route, since hoarders are often emotionally troubled rather than criminally inclined.


Learn More >

Farm Animal Welfare

In polling, 94% of Americans agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion land-based animals, plus countless more aquatic animals, farmed for food each year in the U.S. live in unacceptable conditions that do not align with consumers’ stated values.


Learn More >

Horse Slaughter

Last year, approximately 80,000 American horses were trucked over our borders to be slaughtered for human consumption. Until this practice is banned and Congress passes a law against slaughter here in the U.S., no horse is safe.  


Learn More > 

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